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Captain Obvious
Zockwork Orange

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

deltaqoodrem:

Michelle Rodriguez laying down truths
[x]

That third gif also sums up the reason why so many queer women in fiction get treated like shit and why we barely get acknowledged as existing at all

These pathetic excuses for writers have no idea how to write a woman who doesn’t want to fuck a man

Source: deltaqoodrem

gc14: Daedalic Roundup Part 1 mit The Devil’s Men, Fire, Randal’s Monday und Oh My Gore » Zockwork Orange

"Guardians Far Away" is the upcoming shirt on RIPT, for sale on August 4th only.

"Guardians Far Away" is the upcoming shirt on RIPT, for sale on August 4th only.

But if you close your eyes…

Source: Spotify

The Umbrella Throne via http://www.othertees.com/

The Umbrella Throne via http://www.othertees.com/

30k

30k

The hero’s journey

The hero’s journey

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:
1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:

1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

Source: amandaonwriting

Practical Writing Advice from Chuck Palahniuk

wilddesart:

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
 But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not 
use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands,
Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred
 others you…

Source: wilddesart

it8bit:

Star Wars Pixel

Created by Bugie Pratomo

(via:tiefighters)

Source: tiefighters

This book is just fantastic.
(S. by Doug Dorst & JJ Abrams. The book is called “S.” but is itself a book called “The Ship of Theseus” written by a fictional author named V.M. Straka, accompanied by the notes of two readers who correspond with each other in form of said notes scribbled into this book, which they read in a library.
Wikipedia: “The pages are worn and yellowed with library stamps in the front and back cover and stains on the pages. The book’s spine is labeled with a library sticker marking the novel’s location number in the Dewey Decimal Classification.

The novel can be read alone in its entirety. […] 
A second storyline takes place in the book’s margins. Eric is a disgraced graduate student who has spent his life studying Straka and his literary works. Jen is a college senior contemplating the next step of her life. The two begin to trade a copy of Ship of Theseus back and forth without meeting, using the book’s margins to carry out discussions about who Straka was using handwritten notes, arrows, and symbols.”

I just started and can’t really say if the book is any good but as a piece of art, as an experiment, this is just amazing.

This book is just fantastic.
(S. by Doug Dorst & JJ Abrams. The book is called “S.” but is itself a book called “The Ship of Theseus” written by a fictional author named V.M. Straka, accompanied by the notes of two readers who correspond with each other in form of said notes scribbled into this book, which they read in a library.
Wikipedia: “The pages are worn and yellowed with library stamps in the front and back cover and stains on the pages. The book’s spine is labeled with a library sticker marking the novel’s location number in the Dewey Decimal Classification.

The novel can be read alone in its entirety. […]
A second storyline takes place in the book’s margins. Eric is a disgraced graduate student who has spent his life studying Straka and his literary works. Jen is a college senior contemplating the next step of her life. The two begin to trade a copy of Ship of Theseus back and forth without meeting, using the book’s margins to carry out discussions about who Straka was using handwritten notes, arrows, and symbols.”

I just started and can’t really say if the book is any good but as a piece of art, as an experiment, this is just amazing.

10knotes:

jjellyfishuntingg:

this made my life

He tried so hard not to smile

(via gameblogpunktch)

Source: shady-god

(via wellthisisratherawesome)

Source: feeeb

mikejwitz:

Hup! Ha! Yah! Wahoo!

mikejwitz:

Hup! Ha! Yah! Wahoo!

(via gamefreaksnz)

Source: mikejwitz

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